How Could Two Little Retirement Plans Have Such Big Problems?

Publisher: Madison Pension Services, Inc.

Access this content

Your content has been opened.

Please verify you are a human before downloading this content.

How Could Two Little Retirement Plans Have Such Big Problems? has been emailed to . Entered the wrong email?

Don't see the content in your inbox?
Make sure to check your spam and other messages folders.

Can't get to your email right now?

To complete your registration and access this content, enter the sign-in code sent to your email.

Please enter a valid verification code.

Code sent to:

Also, remember to check in your spam, promotions, and other folders.


Register to access this content


By accessing content on the SHRM Human Resource Vendor Directory you agree to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy; and, you acknowledge that your information may be shared with the content publisher.

How Could Two Little Retirement Plans Have Such Big Problems?

An advisor who I have known for many years called me for help. His client has a problem with their retirement plans and the IRS. The company that sponsors the plans consists of four employees: a father (the business owner), his spouse, his son and his daughter in law. They maintain two plans: a defined benefit pension plan and a profit-sharing plan. The retirement plan consulting firm that set up the plans had the father covered by the defined benefit plan with the other employees waiving out of that plan. The profit-sharing plan covers the other three employees. The father waived out of profit-sharing plan. Their goal was to give the father a large benefit in the defined benefit pension plan and have the other employees receive smaller benefits from the profit-sharing plan. I have not seen the waivers but I was assured that the signed waivers exist.