The (Potential) Dark Side to 401(k) Auto Enrollment - The Participants Seem to Take on More Debt

Publisher: Madison Pension Services, Inc.

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The (Potential) Dark Side to 401(k) Auto Enrollment - The Participants Seem to Take on More Debt

Auto-enrollment has resulted in millions of people who were not previously putting savings into their company’s 401(k) plan, now actively participating in it. That is a good thing. However according to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, many of these workers seem to be offsetting those savings over the long term by taking on more auto and mortgage debt. And that may be a good thing as well. (No, the previous sentence is not a typo.)